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Posts Tagged ‘Exposure Triangle’

Photography is an art form that allows you to create images with the camera that your eye can’t recreate naturally. Light, distance and time can be manipulated to create images that look dreamlike. There are many different techniques that can help you achieve your creative goals. One of these techniques that is most satisfying and fun to do is creating light trails. This is a technique that is not at all difficult and can produce fascinating images.

How to Create Light Trails

Light trails are most typically created by head and tail lights on cars, trucks and road traffic. Though photographing moving boats, aeroplanes and trains can also have good results. The best time to take photos of light trails is just after sunset or into the early evening. Photographers refer to this time as the “Blue Hour”. It is typically the time of the day where everything has a beautiful blue colourcast (this blue hour also happens just before sunrise). In the evening, photos taken after the blue hour won’t show as much detail in the sky as it will be too dark. Also typically the later in the evening it gets, the less traffic there will be to photograph.

What to look for when making light trails

To make light trails you need to look for a busy road or intersection, or at least somewhere where traffic is passing consistently with it’s lights on. You also need to consider your composition and what will appear in the bac

In photography the terms to be ‘open’ or to be ‘closed’, don’t refer to a photographer’s personality! What these terms refer to are the settings the photographer uses on a camera when taking the photo. But to be more specific, these terms refer to the setting of the lens, its aperture. Understanding this is the key to getting better results when taking your next photo.

Have you ever noticed and wondered why in portrait photos, the person being photographed is often the only part of the photo that is sharp and everything else is out of focus? That’s because the photographer used a wide aperture. On the other hand, often in landscape photos, everything seems in focus from the foreground to the background. This is because the photographer used a closed aperture. Sounds confusing?

The aperture controls what is known as the depth of field. Depth of field means how much of the photo is in or out of focus and is measured in f/stops. This is covered in more detail in my other blog post The Exposure Triangle: Part 2 Aperture. When taking a photo it is well worth considering the aperture and what impact changing it can make o

One form of photography that I really enjoy is long exposure photography. I find this kind of photography pleasing to view and also a lot of fun to create. Longer exposures allow the photographer to express movement in the final image. If the exposure is long enough, it can give the illusion of flattening out the ripples and waves when photographing water or can create wispy clouds when incorporating skies into the photo. Longer exposures are most often used in landscape photography, architectural or astral photography.

Longer Exposures Expressing Movement

Longer exposures work by allowing the camera’s shutter to stay open for an extended time. So if taking a photo where there is moving water or a cloudy sky, a longer shutter speed will capture more movement and make for a creative shot. Exposures from ½ a second, to 5 seconds, to 5 minutes are common. However unless you are a real enthusiast or pro photographer with neutral density filters, which reduce the amount of light entering the camera, the best times of the day to do long exposures are early in the morning or late in the afternoon/evening when there is less ambient light.

The trick to creating an engaging long exposure photo is to make sure to have a static element in the frame, otherwise the long exposure will look like a blurry photo. If taking a photo of water, rocks or a pier could be used the static element and therefore the w

There are three crucial components to creating every exposure…

ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed

When taking a photo either in automatic or in full manual mode, there are three crucial components to creating every exposure. ISO, Shutter Speed and Aperture. Each component influences the other and reducing one component means increasing another. When using automatic, the camera decides the setting for you, however if you want to take control and have more creativity with your photography, it is a good idea to understand how the exposure triangle works and switch to Manual or Semi Manual. This is Part 3 of a 3 part series of blog posts on the exposure triangle.

Part 3: Shutter Speed

There are three crucial components to creating every exposure…

ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed

When taking a photo either in automatic or in full manual mode, there are three crucial components to creating every exposure. ISO,  Aperture and Shutter Speed. Each component influences the other and reducing one component means increasing another. When using automatic, the camera decides the setting for you, however if you want to take control and have more creativity with your photography, it is a good idea to understand how the exposure triangle works and switch to Manual or Semi Manual. This is Part 2 of a 3 part series of blog posts on the exposure triangle.

Part 2: Aperture

There are three crucial components to creating every exposure.

ISO, Aperture and Shutter Speed

When taking a photo either in automatic or in full manual mode, there are three crucial components to creating every exposure. ISO,  Aperture and Shutter Speed. Each component influences the other and reducing one component means increasing another. When using automatic, the camera decides the setting for you; however if you want to take control and have more creativity with your photography, it is a good idea to understand how the exposure triangle works and switch to Manual or Semi Manual. This is Part 1 of a 3 part series of blog posts on the exposure triangle.

Part 1: ISO

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