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Posts Tagged ‘Photographer’

It’s been a while since I last blogged, so I thought it was time to post another post! In the past I have given tips about photography and explained about camera settings etc. Now I am going to start to tell you about the photos I have taken and how I took them. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.

Pink Sky Over Freshwater Beach


Located on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, Freshwater Beach does not receive the tourist crowds as much as other Sydney beaches. The name originally comes from a freshwater stream that once ran down to the beach and into the sea. The stream may no longer be there, but the beauty of this beach still remains.

This photo was taken on the southern end of the beach looking north at sunset. As the tide was fairly high and the waves were breaking over the rock

Photography is an art form that allows you to create images with the camera that your eye can’t recreate naturally. Light, distance and time can be manipulated to create images that look dreamlike. There are many different techniques that can help you achieve your creative goals. One of these techniques that is most satisfying and fun to do is creating light trails. This is a technique that is not at all difficult and can produce fascinating images.

How to Create Light Trails

Light trails are most typically created by head and tail lights on cars, trucks and road traffic. Though photographing moving boats, aeroplanes and trains can also have good results. The best time to take photos of light trails is just after sunset or into the early evening. Photographers refer to this time as the “Blue Hour”. It is typically the time of the day where everything has a beautiful blue colourcast (this blue hour also happens just before sunrise). In the evening, photos taken after the blue hour won’t show as much detail in the sky as it will be too dark. Also typically the later in the evening it gets, the less traffic there will be to photograph.

What to look for when making light trails

To make light trails you need to look for a busy road or intersection, or at least somewhere where traffic is passing consistently with it’s lights on. You also need to consider your composition and what will appear in the bac

In photography the terms to be ‘open’ or to be ‘closed’, don’t refer to a photographer’s personality! What these terms refer to are the settings the photographer uses on a camera when taking the photo. But to be more specific, these terms refer to the setting of the lens, its aperture. Understanding this is the key to getting better results when taking your next photo.

Have you ever noticed and wondered why in portrait photos, the person being photographed is often the only part of the photo that is sharp and everything else is out of focus? That’s because the photographer used a wide aperture. On the other hand, often in landscape photos, everything seems in focus from the foreground to the background. This is because the photographer used a closed aperture. Sounds confusing?

The aperture controls what is known as the depth of field. Depth of field means how much of the photo is in or out of focus and is measured in f/stops. This is covered in more detail in my other blog post The Exposure Triangle: Part 2 Aperture. When taking a photo it is well worth considering the aperture and what impact changing it can make o

While there are many forms of photography, some styles that are forever changing are urban and street photography. The street is full of exciting photography prospects, day, night, sun or rain. If you are lucky (or unlucky) enough to live in the city, there is always something going on that can create an interesting subject. So grab your camera and let’s go play in the street!

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5 Steps To Keep Photography Fun

For most of us photography is an enjoyable pastime. We shoot photos of family and friends, the odd selfie, landscapes and even that beautiful sunset overlooking the neighbours tiled rooftop with TV antenna included!

Yes it’s lots of fun taking happy snaps, but it’s not until later when we look at them on the computer that we realise that the photos we took don’t really look much like what we hoped they would. We start feeling discouraged and begin to doubt that photography is fun after all.

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