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Posts Tagged ‘Composition’

Photography is an art form that allows you to create images with the camera that your eye can’t recreate naturally. Light, distance and time can be manipulated to create images that look dreamlike. There are many different techniques that can help you achieve your creative goals. One of these techniques that is most satisfying and fun to do is creating light trails. This is a technique that is not at all difficult and can produce fascinating images.

How to Create Light Trails

Light trails are most typically created by head and tail lights on cars, trucks and road traffic. Though photographing moving boats, aeroplanes and trains can also have good results. The best time to take photos of light trails is just after sunset or into the early evening. Photographers refer to this time as the “Blue Hour”. It is typically the time of the day where everything has a beautiful blue colourcast (this blue hour also happens just before sunrise). In the evening, photos taken after the blue hour won’t show as much detail in the sky as it will be too dark. Also typically the later in the evening it gets, the less traffic there will be to photograph.

What to look for when making light trails

To make light trails you need to look for a busy road or intersection, or at least somewhere where traffic is passing consistently with it’s lights on. You also need to consider your composition and what will appear in the bac

Over the past 20 years technology has advanced at lightning speed. During this time there have been many huge advances in cameras and camera equipment. These days all cameras have auto focus, LCD screens so you can see your photo the instant it was taken and some cameras can even add data to the photo to give an exact GPS point where the photo was taken in the world.

Why It Is Better To Shoot Black & White Photos In Colour

Looking back two decades, the majority of people were unaware of the evolution that photography was about to undertake. In the 1990’s photographers were still using film to take their photos. There was the choice of shooting film in traditional black & white or shooting in colour unless you opened the camera and changed the film roll. Back then as nobody knew any differently and so everyone was happy to shoot in one medium or the other. Fast forward 20 years to where we are today and the vast majority of people using cameras are only using digital. Film has been left as a distant memory, used only by diehard traditionalists or young art students discovering film for the first time.

The Wonders Of Modern Technology

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Is That Bokeh Or Just Plain Old Blur?

The word bokeh comes from the Japanese word for blur. In photography though it is more than this, it’s the quality of the blur. There are certain elements however that determine if it is bokeh, or just plain old blur.

Have you ever looked at a portrait photo in a magazine, book or online and been amazed by the soft out of focus and blurry background. This is usually the result of focusing on your subject and using a wide open aperture. Or in other words, an aperture with a low f/ number. A wide aperture helps to isolate the subject and throw the back ground out of focus. As a rule anything from f/4 and lower will create this effect. Having said that, the lower the f/ number at say f/2, the more the background will be thrown out of focus and look blurry.

5 Steps To Keep Photography Fun

For most of us photography is an enjoyable pastime. We shoot photos of family and friends, the odd selfie, landscapes and even that beautiful sunset overlooking the neighbours tiled rooftop with TV antenna included!

Yes it’s lots of fun taking happy snaps, but it’s not until later when we look at them on the computer that we realise that the photos we took don’t really look much like what we hoped they would. We start feeling discouraged and begin to doubt that photography is fun after all.

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